Mindfulness Group for Sex Workers

Mindfulness for Sex Workers image

What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is a process of noticing, experiencing sensation, and increasing awareness. It is a paying attention on purpose in and to the present moment, while noticing but not having to believe any judgments. It is a state of ‘being’, rather than ‘doing’.

Why this group?

  • Meet like-minded people
  • Learn mindfulness practice
  • Learn embodiment 
  • Decrease stress
  • Enhance the quality of business life
  • Increase choice and internal freedom

Information About the Group

In this group you will learn mindfulness techniques and exercises. The group is geared towards both beginning practitioners of mindfulness as well as those who already have a practice and want to deepen their practice as well as connect with others who are like minded. This class runs on 6-8 week cycles and meets for 6 sessions. No mindfulness experience necessary.

This group is for self identified sex workers. This includes people who have sex for money, have private websites, work for another website, peepshow work, work in porn stores, work phone sex lines, do bodywork and massage, fetish workers, tantrikas, work at a sex club, work for porn companies, etc.

This group is for self identified sex workers. 

 

To Register: 415.286.5014  Dr.Denise.Renye@gmail.com

 

Facilitator: Denise Renye, PsyD. (PSY28096)

Denise’s office is in the lovely Laurel Heights area of San Francisco, where she offers individual and group psychotherapy. She practices sex positive psychotherapy and has extensive clinical experience working with sexuality and, specifically, sex workers. She is non-judgmental and holistic in her approach. She has worked with self-identified sex workers and understands the unique internal and external life experiences that are involved in this industry. She holds a Masters degree in Human Sexuality from the Widener University’s Human Sexuality Department and is a certified Sexologist through the American College of Sexologists.

And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
— Anais Nin
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